Blog

Sep 14

Jerky Fit for a Dog

Posted by Bark to Basics

Jerky treats are a favorite of my basset hounds, Tabasco and Dharma, and finding the snacks made in the USA with all natural ingredients and in a variety that won’t interfere with Dharma’s chicken allergy for less than $28 per pound can be a challenge. After reading about dogs suffering from kidney failure from eating chicken jerky treats from China I decided it was time to try my hand at making these favorites at home.

I purchased a food dehydrator along with a jerky gun and a range of ground jerky ingredients (pork, turkey, beef and lamb) and set out to make my first batch. I mixed each pound of meat with a 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder and a healthy sprinkle of parsley. Although large amounts of garlic can be problematic for dogs moderate servings (about 1 clove per day for a 50 lb dog) have many health benefits such as repelling fleas and acting as a natural antibiotic.

 

After each batch was mixed  it was simple to create strips and logs using the jerky gun. I then placed them on the dehydrator and dried.

  

They were an instant hit!

With a successful first batch of jerky under my belt I decided to create some other snacks for the dogs to enjoy – sweet potatoes and a range of fruit – which were devoured almost as quickly as the jerky.

 

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Jun 13

An Ounce of Prevention – Get Prepped for the 4th of July!

Posted by Bark to Basics

I know it’s only June but now is the time to start preparing Fido for the 4th. Many dogs, young and old, are terrified of the fireworks the July holiday brings and with a little planning your dog can be ready for the grand finale.

  • Desensitize and counter condition your dog. Buy a fireworks CD and begin playing it each day. Start with the volume low and play during meal and play times. You can also give your dog a treat each time a firework explodes on the CD. During the grand finale be sure to have many small treats ready so you can reward your dog rapidly. Each day turn the volume up a little more. It is important to use high value treats, not the usual kibble or dry biscuits, during this training. Try pea size pieces of chicken or cheese.
  • If your dog is crate trained and happiest in his den use the crate while playing the CD in preparation for the real thing (you can also use a small room). On the 4th leave your dog in her safe space with a peanut butter stuffed and frozen Kong or another tasty and long-lasting treat. Close windows and leave the radio or TV on to help drown out the sound. Try an herbal anti-anxiety blend such as Animals’ Apawthecary Tranquility or Dog Appeasing Pheromone spray or plug-in to help her relax.
  • If you don’t feel your dog can stay home alone during the show ask a friend or relative to watch your dog or take him to his favorite doggy daycare for playtime. If your dog absolutely panics each year when the fireworks start another option is to plan a trip to a quiet area for the day to avoid the noise. No matter where you spend the 4th make sure she has ID tags on and is in a secure area before the start of the fireworks. A large number of dogs run away on this holiday when they become afraid.
  • Some dogs are incredibly afraid of fireworks and have an extreme reaction such as trying to break through doors and windows or destroying the house. Counter conditioning can be a very slow process with these guys and it may be best to see your veterinarian for medication to get him through the day.
  • Remember it is easiest to teach a puppy not to fear loud noises instead of waiting for a fear to develop. Spend your pups first 4th in an area where he can hear the fireworks (but not too close) and reward each time one explodes. Use high value treats.

A little prevention now will go a long way to ensure your dog is celebrating alongside you for years to come.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Apr 13

Adopt an active approach to your dog’s well-being

Posted by Bark to Basics

As a society we have learned to become passive spectators in many ways, looking to others for answers and guidance instead of doing research and asking the right questions ourselves. In order to truly do the best we can by our pets we have to develop a new way of thinking. It’s important to take a more involved, active approach to ensure your dog is as healthy and happy as they can be.

This applies to all aspects of your pet’s care from the medical attention they receive to the food they eat and the training methods you use to teach them. The next time you take your dog in to the vet ask yourself if your dog really needs a Lyme vaccine when he is never in an area with ticks or if another steroid shot is really the best solution for her itching. Talk with the doctor about your concerns and ask about the risks and benefits for treatments and preventatives before agreeing to them. If your dog has a chronic issue or illness that is always treated the same just to come back in a week or month ask yourself (and your vet) what you can do to address the underlying issue instead of just putting a band aid on the symptoms.You should respect the fact that your vet went through extensive medical schooling but also value your role as your pet’s guardian and decision maker. If your vet doesn’t like you asking questions or raising concerns it might be time to find one who is willing to be a partner in your pet’s care rather than a dictator.

This applies to other aspects of your pet’s well-being too. If you find yourself wondering if the trainer insisting on choke chains and alpha rolls (read: call Bark to Basics) really has your dog’s best interest in mind make your concerns heard or find another trainer. When the person at the gym tells you any “people food” is terrible for your dog pick up a book on canine nutrition and find out for yourself.

Our dogs rely on us to make the best decisions we can when it comes to their health and happiness. We are their advocates and with that comes responsibility and many times, questioning the status quo. Ask the questions your dog’s would ask if they could talk. Do I really need another vaccine? Why is “people” food bad for me? While you’re at it, you should start applying this approach to your own health and wellness too!

 

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Apr 4

The results are in

Posted by Bark to Basics

Well, after weeks of voting and waiting for the OC Hotlist to announce the top businesses in the dog training category the results are finally in. I’m happy to announce Bark to Basics took second place!

You can check out the results here:

http://oc.cityvoter.com/contests/oc-hotlist/4786/pets/training

Thanks to everyone who showed their support and voted.

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Apr 1

Discounted follow ups and in home boarding services offered

Posted by Bark to Basics

Discounted Prices on Follow-Up Sessions

For all of you who have completed a training package of 3, 6 or 8 lessons Bark to Basics is now offering follow-up sessions for a discounted rate of $85. Follow-ups are great if your pooch could use some freshening up on commands or you have new problems to solve.

 

In Home Boarding

Need a place for your dog to stay during your upcoming vacation? Bark to Basics is now offering in home boarding. Dogs stay in my home and live like they’re part of the family while you’re away. I stick with your routine and rules so your dog settles in smoothly. Dogs are supervised while mingling and daily 45-60 minute walks are provided. You can add training time to the stay as well.

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